COVID-19 Emergency Resources

Key Facts about Breastfeeding and Emergencies, including COVID-19.
*Page updated May 27, 2020

Our goal at Breastfeeding Family Friendly Communities is to support all families in our community during this unprecedented and stressful time. We know that information and recommendations are changing rapidly and it can be difficult to find the resources you need to sustain your family. Please see below for information, resources, tips, and support.

Feel free to reach out directly by email if you have questions: contact@breastfeedingcommunities.org 

What Can I Do Now?

It can be difficult to feel like you are doing enough to care for yourself and your family in a situation like this. The best thing to do is follow general safety and hygiene guidelines to try to prevent the spread of illness:

  • Stay home when possible
  • Wash your hands frequently and thoroughly
  • Follow all local (Orange County, Durham, Response in North Carolina) authorities’ guidelines and recommendations
  • The United States Breastfeeding Committee invites health care providers, pregnant and breastfeeding families, and all public health stakeholders to share how the pandemic is impacting the infant feeding experience
  • If needed, read a guide to help children cope with the psychological effects of the COVID-19 pandemic.

The Center for Disease Control (CDC) has more information on How to Protect Yourself from Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19)

Research shows that infants and children are vulnerable during emergencies.

Breastfeeding saves lives! Human milk is always clean, requires no fuel, water, or electricity, and is available, even in the direst circumstances.

  • Human milk contains antibodies that fight infection, including diarrhea and respiratory infections common among infants in emergency situations.
  • Human milk provides infants with perfect nutrition, including the proper amount of vitamins and minerals required for normal growth.
  • Breastfeeding releases hormones that lower stress and anxiety in both babies and mothers.
  • Mothers who breastfeed are able to keep their babies warm to prevent hypothermia.

Breastfeeding in an emergency!

Updated COVID-19 Case Statistics:

COVID-19 Symptoms:

  • Reported illnesses have ranged from mild symptoms to severe illness and death for confirmed COVID19 cases.
  • These symptoms may appear 2-14 days after exposure (based on the known information about the incubation period of MERS-CoV viruses).
  • Fever
  • Cough
  • Shortness of breath

What to Do if You Have Symptoms:

When to Seek Emergency Medical Care:

If you develop emergency warning signs for COVID-19 get medical attention (call 911) immediately.

Emergency warning signs include:

  • Trouble breathing
  • Persistent pain or pressure in the chest
  • New confusion or inability to arouse
  • Bluish lips or face
  • Please call ahead if you are experiencing COVID-19 symptoms so health care providers can properly
  • prepare for your arrival.

How to Care for Someone at Home:

Most people who get sick with COVID-19 will have only mild illness and should recover at home.* Accoring to the CDC, care at home can help stop the spread of COVID-19 and help protect people who are at risk for getting seriously ill from COVID-19.

If you are caring for someone at home, monitor for emergency signs, prevent the spread of germs, treat symptoms, and carefully consider when to end home isolation.

*Note: Older adults and people of any age with certain serious underlying medical conditions like lung disease, heart disease, or diabetes are at higher risk for developing more serious complications from COVID-19 illness and should seek care as soon as symptoms start.

Coping During COVID-19

From the CDC — MENTAL HEALTH RESOURCES:

Need help? Know someone who does?

If you, or someone you care about, are feeling overwhelmed with emotions like sadness, depression, or anxiety, or feel like you want to harm yourself or others

SAMHSA Disaster Distress Hotline: Call 1-800-985-5990 or text TalkWithUs to 66746 to connect with a trained crisis counselor.

Domestic Violence Resources

If you or a loved one are in immediate danger, contact 911.

The National Domestic Violence hotline offers 24/7 call and online chat services. All chats and calls are completely confidential. Call 1-800-799-7233 or text LOVEIS to 22522. Domestic violence service providers are considered essential services and should continue to operate under Stay-at-Home orders. 

If you or a loved one are in immediate danger, contact 911.

The National Domestic Violence hotline offers 24/7 call and online chat services. All chats and calls are completely confidential. Call 1-800-799-7233 or text LOVEIS to 22522. Domestic violence service providers are considered essential services and should continue to operate under Stay-at-Home orders. 

Resources for Child Care Programs

Contact Us

Please email contact@breastfeedingcommunities.org with any additional resources that need to be added to this page.